“Come to Me, all you who labour and are burdened, and I will give you rest.. learn from Me, for I am meek and humble of heart, and you will find rest for yourselves.”

– Matthew 11:28-29

How blessed we are to have the Lord truly present in the Blessed Sacrament, and to be able to visit Him and to rest there upon His Heart for a little while.

Sometimes, at Mass, we need to be very careful in engaging not only all of our senses but also our will, so that we take part fully in the Sacrifice of the Mass, drawing from it every possible grace. It is very easy to go to Mass with a mind filled with distractions so that we might be there in body, but our thoughts – and our hearts – are elsewhere. And then we wonder why we ‘get’ so little from the Mass.

It is easy, too, to enter the Church and almost immediately forget in Whose presence we stand. In this Tabernacle, it is truly the Lord – the same Lord Who walked through the Holy Land; the same Lord Who called each of the Apostles; the same Lord Who suffered and died and rose again.

And when we forget, we begin to act accordingly – losing our sense of reverance, whilst often disturbing the peace of those who have not; speaking as though in the street; doing everything else except praying to the Lord Who is before us in the Tabernacle.

One way of correcting this is to spend some time in Church, before the Tabernacle, outwith Mass – preferably alone, apart from the Lord.

At these moments, it is perhaps a little easier for us to be mindful of the Presence of the Lord, to quieten our thoughts, to let go of distractions and the general cares of everyday life, and to simply be there with Him, resting upon His Heart, as He invites us to do.

Being mindful of His true Presence in the Tabernacle is crucially important; it is His sacramental Presence here which makes every Catholic Church different to every other place on earth. Here, the Lord is. Here He has been for two thousand years, waiting for us, welcoming us.

And when we are mindful of His Presence, that is the moment in which real prayer, that intimate conversation between friends, can begin.